OUR FOCUS
   
As a housing and community development organization, JPNSI takes an intersectional approach to developing sustainable, democratic and economically just neighborhoods and communities in New Orleans.​​
Utilizing the Community Land Trust (CLT) model of land conservation and shared equity, JPNSI's work focuses on increasing the range of affordable housing options available to low and moderate income residents by encouraging resident-controlled development; advocating for shared-equity models of homeownership, renting, and cooperative housing; and promoting community-building initiatives that advance equitable housing patterns, neighborhood stability, and community-driven land use planning.

OUR  APPROACH

The CLT model is an increasingly popular tool to protect low- and moderate-income residents against displacement due to the rising cost of living in their neighborhoods. JPNSI purchases and holds land in perpetuity, and leases or sells homes on the land to residents at an affordable rate. CLT housing is permanently affordable, protecting the public investment and recycling the subsidy for generations of residents and families.

In addition to developing permanently affordable housing, JPNSI is a strong advocate for the rights of renters and low-income homeowners in New Orleans. From hosting community education events to testifying in front of City Council in support of expanded tenant rights and protecting New Orleans’ dwindling supply of affordable housing stock, JPNSI is fighting to ensure a more New Orleans welcoming, diverse, affordable, and equitable New Orleans.

OUR WORK

1. Expanding housing opportunities for low and moderate income residents. 

In 2016, JPNSI opened the first permanently affordable apartment building in New Orleans- the Palmyra Street Apartments.  The Palmyra Street Apartments serve families making up to 60% and 80% of Area Median Income (roughly $36,000 and $48,000 for a family of four, respectively).

We are currently working to develop 14 more units of permanently affordable housing in Mid-City, ensuring that residents of all income levels can enjoy the benefits of community reinvestment and redevelopment our neighborhood.

2. Growing a base of community support.

Over the past two years, JPNSI reached thousands of residents through our community engagement programming. We’ve spoken on panels, held mixers at bars, and knocked on doors in our neighborhood. We’ve hosted teach-ins on housing issues and tenant rights, community dinners for residents in our service area, and ice cream socials for our tenants.


3. Fighting for tenants’ rights.

In the winter of 2016, we worked with low-income tenants at the American Can Apartments, organizing to resist their immediate eviction due to price increases. We mobilized tenants, social justice activists, and concerned residents; supported tenants in drafting a demand letter; and convened a press conference rally on the steps of City Hall. Our support helped tenants secure  a 10-month extension of their leases, monetary support for relocation, and access to a housing counselor to help tenants find new homes. We assisted several tenants in securing permanently affordable housing at The Pythian, an apartment complex co-owned by the Crescent City Community Land Trust and Green Coast Enterprises.

4. Building Renter Equity for our residents.

We believe that tenants are valuable members of communities. This year, we’re running a Renter Equity pilot program with our tenants to put community-control into practice. Through participating in building management, organizational decision-making, and community activities, residents can build equity in the Palmyra Street Apartments, building wealth over time and encouraging long-term residency in our CLT.

5. Becoming a model for sustainable affordable housing.

JPNSI’s commitment to permanent affordability is increasingly being recognized as a needed model for housing development in New Orleans. Our advocacy around permanent affordability ensures decision-makers understand how CLTs operate and how CLTs maximize public and private investments in housing since multiple generations can receive the benefit of affordability.